The PrintPOD Network announces first cloud printing solution for Androids

posted Jun 28, 2010, 5:36 AM by Scott Salisbury   [ updated Jun 28, 2010, 5:38 AM ]

News Element


 

 09 Jun 2010

Cloud printing is now available on Android-based smart phones with an application provided by GlobalPrint Systems Inc.

GlobalPrint Systems, a 5-year old venture founded to enable cloud printing in public spaces, has released an Android application which enables true cloud printing uploads to its PrintPOD network. GlobalPrint has units installed in such public space locations as convention centers, hotels, resorts and airport lounges. The company’s install base of enabled printers, nodes and kiosks can be used by consumers to walk up, login, print and go.

According to a release, users can "print to the cloud" using a number of methods, including the Android SmartPhone.

A consumer can download the free uploader from the company’s website, then use it from within any Windows based application by simply choosing File… Print… and choosing the PrintPOD. Consumers can also print from thumb drives or by sending an email to the user’s unique email address. Now, users can also use their Android smart phone to select any document on the phone’s storage, email folders, SMS text messages or photo gallery. The application is available now on the Android Market by searching for "PrintPOD."

"What is truly different about our patent-pending offering is that it is non-destination specific," Mislinski said. "Users print to the cloud, not to a specific print device. Users can find enabled locations using Google Maps (either on a web browser or with the Android application), approach a device, login, and choose their document, print and go." Unlike other products which require the advance selection of a specific printer, entering "release codes" or finding an open Wi-Fi or Bluetooth printer, the PrintPOD approach is the ultimate in ease of use.

The simplicity of the implementation relieves the owner of the printer from having to interact with the user, but it encourages "stickiness" — the consumer will stay at the coffee shop, bookstore, or other public location and use more services since printing is available. For example, the job seeker working on her resume at a coffee shop will now buy more coffee since output is now available. Owners of print devices also enjoy revenue from these consumer interactions, underwriting the total cost of ownership of a device they most likely already own to print emails, invoices, customer orders and other general business documents. The site owner can now move the printer from the back office to the public space, encouraging consumer use and capturing more consumer transactions.





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